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For Immediate Release:

Media Contact: Marc Kruskol

MJK Public Relations: (661) 538-1789

marc@mjkpr.com

 

PROFILES IN HISTORY TO OFFER ORSON WELLES’ PERSONAL SHOOTING SCRIPT FOR “CITIZEN KANE” AS PART OF THEIR 3-DAY MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR HOLLYWOOD AUCTION, SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 1, 2015

One of the most important motion picture discoveries of the 21st century – Orson Welles’ long-lost shooting script from “Citizen Kane” – not seen in 74 years.

Not seen for over 74 years and thought to be lost, Welles’ third and final revision, signed by principal cast members, clearly shows his annotations, directing notes and diagrams for blocking camera angles is the centerpiece of “Orson Welles: A Journey Through his Life and Times,” a collection which also includes the typed first rough draft by Herman Mankiewicz of “American” (the working title for “Citizen Kane”) and the Mankiewicz typed original story and screenplay manuscript for “Citizen Kane”—all three scripts obtained directly from Orson Welles.

 

Calabasas, CA—Orson Welles’ personal shooting script for Citizen Kane, which had been thought to have been lost forever, will be offered by Profiles in History, the world’s largest auctioneer of Hollywood memorabilia, as part of their highly anticipated Hollywood Auction 74, September 29 through October 1, 2015. Not seen for over 74 years, this third and final revision of the film many movie historians consider the best film ever made, clearly shows Welles’ annotations, directing notes and diagrams for blocking camera angles, and is signed by the film’s principal cast members. (Please see the complete description below.)

 

The script is the centerpiece of “Orson Welles: A Journey Through his Life and Times,” a collection of Welles’ career landmarks, which also includes the typed first rough draft (by Herman Mankiewicz) of American, the working title for Citizen Kane; Welles’ vintage, original draft screenplay for Citizen Kane (“original story and screenplay by Herman J. Mankiewicz”); an original CBS-issued transcript of Welles’ Mercury Theatre broadcast of War of the Worlds; Welles and John Houseman signed Mercury Theatre exclusivity agreement, and many more important documents and photographs.

“The scripts from Citizen Kane from Welles’ personal collection are monumentally important in the story of the creation of the film, and look as fresh as when they were created while the novice director-producer-writer-star was preparing his masterpiece – at age 25…In the Third Revised Final shooting script, in never-before-seen handwritten notes, may be Welles’ first attempt, late in production, to write one of the key scenes of the film…”

Harlan Lebo – author of Citizen Kane: A Filmmaker’s Journey.

Qualified bidders can participate in person, by telephone, fax, submit absentee bids or participate online in real time from anywhere with Internet access across the globe. For more information, please visit www.profilesinhistory.com.

 

Full Descriptions:

Lot 579. Citizen Kane Orson Welles’ personal 3rd revised final shooting script with numerous hand-notations, signed by principal cast members. (RKO Pictures, 1941) Vintage original 3rd revised 156-page final shooting script for Citizen Kane dated “7/16/40”, hand annotated by Orson Welles. Signed on the title page missing perforated lower portion by cast members Ray Collins, Agnes Moorehead, Everett Sloane, George Coulouris, Paul Stewart, Joseph Cotten, and Erskine Sanford. The shooting script exhibits traditional strikethrough lines which Welles would have marked off on each page as shooting was completed. There are also X’s through finished dialogue passages, and recurring hand-written annotations. On the back of page 99 there is a diagram that could represent camera set-up or other technical information. An extensive hand-written paragraph by Welles appears on the back of page 137 and reads, in full: “Well Charles – Our foreclosure of your international newspaper syndicate is not only serious business – After all you’ve been able to print your opinion for over 30 years now – Kane – Yes”. There are other examples of secretarial writing dictated by Welles’ to his well-known assistant Katherine Popper. Also includes 13-page shot breakdown dated July 16, 1940 with cinematographer Gregg Toland’s name written in unknown hand. Presented in a vintage board-bound black folder. Cover and content remain in vintage very fine condition. Provenance: Acquired by the consignor directly from Orson Welles. $20,000 – $30,000

Lot 578. Citizen Kane Orson Welles’ personal typed manuscript “original story and screenplay by Herman J. Mankiewicz”. (RKO Pictures, 1941) Vintage original Herman J. Mankiewicz 156-page typed draft screenplay for Citizen Kane. Black paper folder-bound with title page typed with title and “Original Story and Screen Play by Herman J. Mankiewicz”. In March of 1940, Orson Welles sent Mankiewicz and close friend John Houseman (tasked with making sure Mankiewicz wrote rather than getting drunk) to Mrs. Campbell’s Guest Ranch retreat in Victorville, California some 60 miles outside of Los Angeles to write the first drafts of Citizen Kane, with a 300-page draft script of dialogue and camera instructions by Welles as a starting point. At one time there was a dispute over who would be credited with writing the screenplay when Welles began promoting himself as a one-man show – writer, director and actor. But Mankiewicz, who many historians assert wrote the bulk of the script, prevailed. This draft assigning original story credit as well as screen writing credit to Mankiewicz attests to his profound influence on the origins of this iconic film, which would earn him his one and only Academy Award. From the opening shot of the film, the ultimate shooting script changed very little from this draft. Presented in a vintage board-bound black folder with interior cover exhibiting folds and creases, script pages show minor chipping with no paper-loss. In overall vintage fine condition. Provenance: Acquired by the consignor directly from Orson Welles. $20,000 – $30,000

Lot 577. “American” working title for Citizen Kane Orson Welles’ personal typed manuscript first rough draft by Herman Mankiewicz. (RKO Pictures, 1941) Vintage original typed 267-page First Rough Draft by Orson Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz of “American” which would become one of the greatest films in the history of the cinema, Citizen Kane. In March of 1940, Orson Welles sent Mankiewicz and close friend John Houseman (tasked with making sure Mankiewicz wrote rather than getting drunk) to Mrs. Campbell’s Guest Ranch retreat in Victorville, California some 60 miles outside of Los Angeles to write the first drafts of Citizen Kane, with a 300-page draft script of dialogue and camera instructions by Welles as a starting point. In an article titled “Scripts of Citizen Kane” by Robert Carringer, the author makes mention of the draft offered here, “Mankiewicz’s April 16, 1940 draft clocks in at approximately 250 pages but exhibits huge gaps in continuity…” This draft differs from the produced screenplay in some subtle and some more extreme ways. In the example of the opening, it is written, “FADE IN – A VAST GATEWAY OF GRILLED IRON (in the middle of which is clearly seen a huge initial “K”) stretching clear across the road. As the CAMERA MOVES towards it, the gate opens and the CAMERA PASSES through. A few feet further on, the gate having closed behind it, the CAMERA REVEALS, either because it has reached the top of a small incline or because it has turned a bend, (depending upon the topography to be selected)…” As compared to the ultimate shooting script, which opens with, “FADE IN: EXT. XANADU – FAINT DAWN – 1940 (MINIATURE) Window, very small in the distance, illuminated. All around this is an almost totally black screen. Now, as the camera moves slowly towards the window which is almost a postage stamp in the frame, other forms appear; barbed wire, cyclone fencing, and now, looming up against an early morning sky, enormous iron grille work. Camera travels up what is now shown to be a gateway of gigantic proportions and holds on the top of it – a huge initial “K” showing darker and darker against the dawn sky. Through this and beyond we see the fairy-tale mountaintop of Xanadu…” This 267-page rough draft, dated April 16, 1940, is the earliest known existing draft of Citizen Kane in private hands. Presented in a vintage board bound black folder. Exhibiting only minor toning to edges. In overall, vintage very good to fine condition. Provenance: Acquired by the consignor directly from Orson Welles. $20,000 – $30,000

 

Auction Details:

Day 1: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 11:00am Pacific Time—Lots 1-631:

Day 2: Wednesday, September 30, 2015 11:00am Pacific Time—Lots 632-1264

Day 3: Thursday, October 1, 2015 11:00am Pacific Time—Lots 1265-1905

 

Location: Profiles in History Offices

26662 Agoura Road, Calabasas, CA 91302; Phone: 310-859-7701

For updates and details on the auction: www.profilesinhistory.com

 

About Profiles In History 

Founded in 1985 by Joseph Maddalena, Profiles in History is the world’s largest auctioneer & dealer of original Hollywood Memorabilia, historical autographs, letters, documents, vintage signed photographs and manuscripts. www.profilesinhistory.com.